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Local

Morris High School receives tourniquets, training

Stop the Bleed campaign teaches people to handle bleeding events, use supplies

Celia Mistretta, a biology teacher at Morris Community High School, practices packing gauze in a puncture wound on an artificial leg Wednesday at Stop the Bleed training at the high school.
Celia Mistretta, a biology teacher at Morris Community High School, practices packing gauze in a puncture wound on an artificial leg Wednesday at Stop the Bleed training at the high school.

MORRIS – About 75 Morris Community High School teachers showed up to school early Wednesday to receive a lesson for a change. Within an hour, some had their fingers two-knuckles deep in a bleeding leg wound.

It wasn’t real.

As part of the national Stop the Bleed campaign, the teachers were taught how to treat wounds by paramedics and EMS specialists from Morris Hospital.

“We want to give them the knowledge of how to treat a life-threatening bleed,” said Stephanie Brewer from EMS operations at Morris Hospital EMS systems.

Through a slide show presentation, teachers learned the ABCs of treating traumatic injury: Alert by calling 911, locate the Bleeding and Compress and Control. The idea is that in a situation, the teachers would be able to provide first aid until emergency services come up. Brewer noted that EMS doesn’t go into unsafe situations, and said that at the Columbine shooting EMS couldn’t get inside the building for three and a half hours.

“The person closest is the first responder,” MCHS Principal Kelly Hussey said.

The training was hands-on, however. Teachers practiced using the tourniquet on each other, careful not to go to far so as to actually cause pain, and packing a puncture would on an artificial leg while an EMS specialist pumped fake blood out of it.

Morris Hospital approached the school, Hussey said, and offered to do the training. Along with the training, the Morris Hospital Foundation provided 65 Stop the Bleed kits, enough for every classroom and common area in the building. Each $69 kit contains a permanent marker, two pairs of latex free gloves, a C-A-T tourniquet, an emergency bandage, a pair of trauma sheers and two rolls of gauze dressing.

Morris Hospital is providing the trainings to schools throughout it’s service area.

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